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UBC Wellbeing Annual Report 2020-21

 

Since launching the Wellbeing Strategic Framework in 2019, UBC's shared vision for becoming a health and wellbeing promoting university has become more important than ever in the face of complex societal challenges, including the global pandemic, climate emergency, colonization, and systemic racism.

Despite COVID-19, units, departments and community members from across UBC worked together to significantly advance the Okanagan Charter and Wellbeing Framework's targets and help create campus communities where health and wellbeing for all is championed and supported.

This year, specific attention was made to action wellbeing efforts through a multisolving lens – a dynamic framework used to explore and address interconnected societal challenges in a unified way.

This annual report highlights our collaborative approach to advancing sustainability, decolonization, and equity while advancing wellbeing. As well, it showcases our community's collective resilience and innovation through an unprecedented year.

Scroll down to read the full report, or check out the UBC Wellbeing Annual Report 2020-21- Infographic.  
 


 

Photo credit: Jamil Rhajiak / UBC Brand & Marketing

Mental Health & Resilience 

 

UBC Cares

10% increase in community members who feel mental health is a UBC priority by 2025*.

*2025 target in development 

Metrics 
Measure

At UBC, I feel that student, staff and faculty mental and emotional wellbeing is a priority​*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 20%-9% (decline)
Graduate Students 30%-6% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined41%B
Staff44%B
Faculty29%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 28%-17% (decline)
Graduate Students 39%-14% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined48%B
Staff53%B
Faculty25%B

* % who strongly agree or agree

 

Mental Health Literacy 

10% increase in community members reporting access to opportunities to develop mental health literacy by 2025.

Metrics 
Measure

I know how to access benefits, services and programs that support my health and wellbeing*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined80%B
Staff82%B
Faculty69%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined79%B
Staff84%B
Faculty68%B
Measure

If I needed to seek professional help for my mental or emotional health, I would know how to access resources (online or in-person) provided through my employer*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and faculty combined68%B
Staff72%B
Faculty57%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined70%B
Staff71%B
Faculty66%B
Measure

If I needed to seek professional help for my mental or emotional health, I would know where to access campus-based resources (online or in-person)*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 34%-2% (decline)
Graduate Students 43%+1% (improvement)
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 38%-10% (decline)
Graduate Students 47%-3% (decline)

 Measure

If I needed to seek professional help for my mental or emotional health, I would know where to go for services not offered through my employer*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined57%B
Staff58%B
Faculty53%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined57%B
Staff59%B
Faculty51%B
Measure

If I needed to seek professional help for my mental or emotional health, I would know where to go off campus*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 31%+4% (improvement)
Graduate Students 37%+5% (improvement)
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 37%+8% (improvement)
Graduate Students 42%+2% (improvement)

Measure

In general, how would you rate your ability to handle day-to-day demands in your life?* 

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students29%B
Graduate Students35%B
Staff and Faculty combined43%B
Staff43%B
Faculty43%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students32%B
Graduate Students37%B
Staff and Faculty combined43%B
Staff40%B
Faculty56%B

Measure

The UBC campus climate encourages free and open discussion about mental and emotional health*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 37%-10% (decline)
Graduate Students 41%-4% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined40%B
Staff42%B
Faculty30%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 46%-13% (decline)
Graduate Students 45%-10% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined47%B
Staff51%B
Faculty34%B

 

* % who strongly agree or agree

 

Mental Health & Resilience Highlights  

Thrive Mental Health Campaign Moves Online

While fostering and maintaining mental health is a year-round pursuit, Thrive is a time each November for the UBC community to come together to learn about, talk about, and explore ways to support mental health. In response to the pandemic, the annual initiative went virtual with 199 events, ensuring our community had the support needed to build mental health literacy while living, learning and working from home.  

This past year, events focused on aspects of mental health literacy using the Thrive 5 such as help-seeking, stigma-reduction and diverse perspectives on mental health and additionally addressed the systemic and structural factors that impact the community.  

Learn more about Thrive
 

New Resource: Intersectional Approaches to Mental Health

With the rapid switch to remote work, paired with increased levels of anxiety and mental health challenges in response to COVID-19 uncertainty, the Workplace Wellbeing team adapted quickly to support the mental health of the staff and faculty community, including the development of a new resource:  “Intersectional Approaches to Mental Health - A Facilitator’s Guide”. This guide offers an intersectional approach to support mental health literacy and capacity building from a place of inclusion and diversity.  

Learn more about this resource
 

Mental Health & Resilience Committee Launches

The Mental Health and Resilience Committee reconvened in November 2020 with diverse representation from across UBC Vancouver and Okanagan campuses, including students, faculty, staff, and senior leaders, to focus on advocacy and systems-level change.  

The committee developed three milestones, with working groups, towards achieving the 2025 targets in the Wellbeing Strategic Framework, including 1. Mental health literacy training for managers and leaders, 2. Engagement strategies in collaboration with affinity groups, and 3. Mental health literacy, fluency, and capacity for students and staff/faculty across both campuses. 

Learn more about Mental Health & Resilience targets
 

Okanagan’s Thriving Workplaces Micro Fund Extends Thrive Year-Round  

The UBC Okanagan Workplace Health and Wellbeing team implemented a Thriving Workplaces micro fund to promote workplace wellbeing and to equip units and departments to create and maintain health and wellbeing practices.

The fund, which was implemented during Thrive and again in February 2021, invited units and departments to apply for up to $500 in support activities that reflected the Thrive 5+ themes.

From across the Okanagan campus, 15 units and departments received funds, reaching 195 employees through team cooking classes, scavenger hunts, art and crafting projects, and health-promoting fun challenges to support social connection and resilience in the workplace. 

Learn more about Thrive
 

Peer Health Educator Program Launches 

The Peer Health Educator Program launched to help improve the UBC student experience and support students in building valuable leadership skills. Peer Health Educators are trained student leaders who play a key role in the delivery of programming at the UBC Wellness Centre and on the UBC Vancouver campus.  

Using a peer-to-peer approach, Peer Health Educators share evidence-based health and wellness information through on-campus outreach and education in the form of workshops, booths, events, and campaigns.  

During 2020/21, 69 presentations were booked by campus partners for the new Peer Health Educator program with session themes including grounding exercises, managing stress, getting a good night’s sleep, and connecting with others. 

Learn more about the Peer Health Educator Program
 

 

Building Mentally Healthy Workplaces: Not Myself Today 

Since 2015, UBC has partnered with the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Not Myself Today (NMT) workplace mental health initiative. NMT provides UBC employees with access to a digital portal that includes downloadable resources, evidence-informed activities and tools to help create opportunities for safe and supportive workplace dialogue and raise awareness and understanding of the importance of fostering mental health in the workplace.  

Due to the shift to remote work, as well as concerns related to the mental health impacts of COVID-19 on employees, NMT uptake increased in 2020 by 38% compared to 2019, with a total of 43 unique cross-campus departments utilizing NMT to support mental health in the workplace. 

Learn more about Not Myself Today
 

Wellness Centre Empowers Learners Online 

This past year, the Wellness Centre moved a substantial number of previously in-person health education and health literacy resources online via Canvas through the Wellness Centre: Online. The Canvas course was developed at both UBC Vancouver and Okanagan campuses, with the Vancouver course reaching up to 2,500 students by the end of the academic year.  

In addition, other mental health training programs including Jump Start Orientation, Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR), and Academic Essentials: Live Well to Learn Well went virtual to continue supporting student, faculty, and staff mental health capacity building from the safety of our homes. 
 

Learn more about the Wellness Centre at UBC Vancouver 

Learn more about Student Support & Services at UBC Okanagan
 

Workplace Wellbeing Enhances Faculty and Staff Supports 

With the rapid switch to remote work, paired with increased levels of anxiety and mental health challenges in response to COVID-19 uncertainty, the Workplace Wellbeing team needed to act in fast-paced and innovative ways to support the mental health of the staff and faculty community.  

While adapting a full suite of existing in-person offerings for virtual delivery presented some challenges, it also allowed for the development of new and innovative education and engagement strategies. These included the creation of three self-directed/self-paced learning opportunities on Overcoming Burnout with 574 registrants, Self-care and Community-care with 562 registrants, and Wellbeing in the Workplace with 146 registrants.  

Remote programming was open to both UBC Vancouver and UBC Okanagan employees and content was adapted to reflect the diversity and intersectional nature of UBC’s staff and faculty population.  

The content was specifically targeted towards managers and leaders – building capacity and enabling them to support the wellbeing and mental health of a shifting and remote workforce. 

This adaptability and willingness to try new things enabled the team to deliver 61 virtual mental health workshops and training programs to reach close to 1,614 participants.  

Learn more about Workplace Health, Wellbeing and Benefits at UBC Vancouver

Learn more about Workplace Health and Wellbeing at UBC Okanagan
 

Cross-Campus Collaboration Champions Mental Health Supports 

UBC Okanagan Workplace Health and Wellbeing Services and UBC Vancouver Workplace Health, Wellbeing and Benefits teams worked together to ensure faculty and staff had access to resources and opportunities in light of the pandemic and remote working conditions. This strategic alignment enhanced the accessibility and profile of programs, resources, and initiatives to promote faculty and staff health and wellbeing.
 

Learn more about UBCO Workplace Health and Wellbeing

Learn more about UBCV Workplace Health, Wellbeing and Benefits
 


 

Photo credit: Hover Collective / UBC Brand & Marketing

Collaborative Leadership 

UBC is committed to Wellbeing

Community members feel UBC is committed to the wellbeing of its people, places, and communities.

2025 target in development

Metrics 
Measure

% of students, staff, and faculty who agree or strongly agree that UBC is committed to the wellbeing of its people, places, and communities

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students31%-13% (decline)
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from Baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students41%-18% (decline)

 

 

All Faculties & Units Take Action 

All faculties and units have included wellbeing in their plan and report on progress annually by 2025. 

Metrics 
Measure

# of faculties and units 

Data collection in progress

 

Collaborative Leadership Highlights 

Wellbeing Champions Provide Campus-wide Support 

At UBC, wellbeing is foundational to our success as individuals, as a university, and as a community, and our students, faculty and staff are great champions when it comes to creating an environment that supports wellbeing for all.  

Our vision of becoming a health and wellbeing-promoting campus is one we are approaching collectively and collaboratively, supported by passionate Wellbeing Champions—students, faculty, and staff who are committed to helping UBC achieve this vision by helping to embed and promote wellbeing in their workplaces, learning environments, and portfolios.  

Over 50 Workplace Wellbeing Ambassadors, Wellbeing Liaisons, and more than 30 Graduate Student Wellbeing Ambassadors from across Vancouver and Okanagan campuses helped their fellow students, faculty and staff this year through various forms of support and outlets. 

Learn more about Wellbeing Champion Programs
 

 

Leveraging the Charter to Find Solutions to Complex Societal Issues

Leveraging the Charter was an international, multi-solving event, co-hosted with McGill, Waterloo, and the Canadian Public Health Network to strengthen the understanding of the Okanagan Charter and explore challenges exacerbated by the pandemic.  

Through a multisolving lens to find “solutions to the interconnected problems facing the climate and human society,” over 250 participants helped tackle issues of health and wellbeing in the context of the pandemic, systemic racism, and climate emergency crisis. 

Learn more about Leveraging the Charter 
 

Human Resources Pivots to Implement Courses Online

In December 2020, a new online Canvas module and 2.5 hour workshop was created and facilitated for the Central Human Resource’s Managing at UBC program called Leading Well: Supporting Mental Health and Resilience in the Workplace.  

This program was successfully completed by 65 managers, helping them gain essential leadership skills and foundational tools to succeed and grow while strengthening their understanding of mental health, psychological health, and safety in the workplace.   

Learn more about the Managing at UBC Program
 

 

UBC Climate Emergency Task Force Releases Recommendations

In January 2021, the UBC Climate Emergency Engagement Final Report and Recommendations was released, including strategic priorities related to the intersections of climate justice and wellbeing, core principles of the Okanagan Charter, and UC3 and UBC strategic plans. More specifically initiatives to support community wellbeing in the face of the climate crisis, expanding educational resources, developing new partnerships, accelerating emissions reductions, fostering a culture of advocacy, and ensuring Indigenous perspectives shape climate initiatives and policies were discussed and explored.  

These recommendations led to the development of a student-led Climate Wellbeing Engagement Network, with next steps to embed climate resources in existing mental health workshops and wellbeing newsletters. 
 

Learn more about the UBC Climate Emergency Engagement Final Report 
 

Embedding Wellbeing in Learning Environments 

Wellbeing in Learning Environments continued to expand on the Okanagan campus with phase two of the “TEACHERS Project”. This project aims to equip and support faculty with simple, evidence-based wellbeing interventions to embed into classrooms to facilitate student wellbeing. Results of the project were overwhelmingly positive for improved student engagement, focus, connection to their professor, feelings of sense of community, affect, and that their wellbeing was supported.  

In addition, HEAL 100 ~ Introduction and Principles of Health and Wellbeing, is being offered in both fall and winter terms due to its high demand (online in the fall term), now open to UBC Vancouver students as well.  Another highlight was that Campus Health collaborated with student leaders to host an inspirational “Golden Apple Award” ceremony which celebrated student nominated faculty who are excellently promoting wellbeing in the classroom.
 

 

Incorporating Wellbeing and Change within Land and Food Systems  

In January 2020, Central HR’s Workplace Wellbeing and Change and Transition teams partnered on an innovative two-year pilot project with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems (LFS) leadership team to strengthen the capacity of LFS staff, faculty and teams to navigate change and support wellbeing.  

Some key outcomes from 2020-21 include establishing collaborative connection points to discuss wellbeing, developing and implementing a change and wellbeing survey tool, delivering 6 faculty-wide workshops focused on change and wellbeing topics, embedding change and wellbeing language in strategic plans, key resources and communications channels, organizing 1 strategic planning and reflection workshop, and leading 1 workshop for LFS leaders focused on psychologically healthy and safe leadership practices. 
 

 

 
 

The Move U Crew getting ready to help UBC Move More! 

Physical Activity 

 

Move More

10% reduction in the prevalence of physical inactivity for UBC community members by 2025.

Metrics 

Measure 

% of students, staff, and faculty who report not meeting the Canadian physical activity guidelines. 

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 39%-6% (improvement)
Graduate Students 35%-2% (improvement)
Staff and Faculty combined26%B
Staff28%B
Faculty20%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 31%-7% (improvement)
Graduate Students 30%-10% (improvement)
Staff and Faculty combined23%B
Staff21%B
Faculty19%B

 

 

Diverse Community, Diverse Programming 

10% increase in UBC community members' satisfaction with recreation facilities and programs by 2025.

 

Metrics 
Measure

How satisfied are you with the availability of recreation programs on campus?*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 48%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 33%B

 

Measure

How satisfied are you with the quality of recreation programs on campus?*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 48%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 34%B
Measure

How satisfied are you with the quality of recreation facilities on campus?*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 46%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 30%B

*% who are very satisfied or satisfied

 

Physical Activity Highlights 

Moving More and From Anywhere

The Office of Physical Activity, established by UBC Kinesiology, UBC Wellbeing, and UBC Recreation in 2017, shifted programming online and continues to engage and inspire students, faculty, and staff through physical activity during the pandemic. 

They expanded virtual programming, bringing movement to the UBC community everywhere and anywhere. Get Active at Home, Lunch & Lift, Lift Challenge, Walk for Joy, Move UBC, Instagram Movement Breaks with +26,500 views, and Sports Week with +600 participants, were all initiatives geared towards meeting the needs of the UBC community and bringing physical activity to individuals through reducing barriers such as cost, transportation, and time.

Learn about Move UBC
 

 

Inclusive Physical Activity Toolkit Launched 

The Inclusive Physical Activity Toolkit was designed to support inclusive physical activity across both UBC Vancouver and UBC Okanagan campuses. Created by the Physical Activity Committee comprised of students, faculty, and staff members from both UBC campuses, the toolkit can be used as a guiding document for promoting, planning and advocating for inclusive physical activity within your own context.  

Learn more about Trauma-Informed Practices in Recreation 
 

Diverse Community, Diverse Programming 

Diversity, equity, and inclusion remain at the forefront of planning processes, policies, and programs for the Office of Physical Activity. Guided by the Equity and Inclusion Office’s new Inclusion Action Plan, their office strives to reach the second physical activity target of “Diverse Community, Diverse Programming” in hopes to see a 10% increase in UBC community members’ satisfaction with recreation facilities and programs by 2025. 

The Office of Physical Activity partners with various associations, clubs, and organizations to meet the needs of our diverse population. This year’s highlights included a BIPOC Lunch & Lift, Graduate Student Society virtual classes, and a growing partnership with the Sexual Violence Prevention & Response Office to host an Online Healing Centered Yoga class for survivors and allies to also create safe spaces for physical activity.  
 

 

Actioning Reconciliation within Physical Activity

The Office of Physical Activity strives to create inclusive, equitable and accessible physical activity experiences for all, which remains especially true for Indigenous communities at UBC. In response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) Calls to Action, and BC’s adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the office has committed to actioning reconciliation and decolonization through its programming and practice.  

From aligning efforts with the new Indigenous Strategic Plan to hiring an Indigenous Wellbeing Research Assistant to incorporate Indigenous worldview in recruitment and curriculum development, the Office of Physical Activity is striving to ensure their work is Indigenous informed and Indigenous lead.  

Other initiatives included Musqueam Walks, a virtual walking challenge in partnership with Musqueam Community Centre, and Decolonizing Physical Activity & Sport Panel, Move UBC’s feature event exploring how to decolonize physical activity and sport spaces to help create safe environments across campuses.
 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Martin Dee / UBC Brand & Marketing

Food & Nutrition 

 

Increase Food Security 

Reduce food insecurity for UBC community members by 2025.

Target in development

Metrics 
Measure 

% of population reporting food insecurity

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 13%-24% (improvement)
Graduate Students 20%-22% (improvement)
Staff and Faculty combined5%B
Staff6.25%B
Faculty2%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 13%-16% (improvement)
Graduate Students 23%-19% (improvement)
Staff and Faculty combined8%B
Staff9.52%B
Faculty0%B
 

 

Healthy Beverage Consumption 

50% reduction in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on our campuses by 2025.

 

Metrics 
Measure 

% of sugar-sweetened beverages sales

UBC Vancouver
Location DataChange from baseline (B)
Food Services & Athletics/Rec32%

B (No 2021 data - COVID)

AMS68%B (No 2021 data - COVID)
UBC Okanagan 
LocationDataChange from baseline (B)
TBDTBDTBD

 

 Measure 

% of sugar-sweetened beverage availability in vending

UBC Vancouver
Campus DataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver25%

-1% (improvement)

UBC Okanagan 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Okanagan21%

-10% (improvement)

Measure 

# outlets with no sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB)

UBC Vancouver
Location DataChange from baseline (B)
Food Services, SHCS,
& Athletics/Rec
2

+2 (improvement)
Note: closed during 2020

AMS0B
UBC Okanagan 
LocationDataChange from baseline (B)

Food Services, SHCS,
& Athletics/Rec

1 of 3

+1 (improvement)

 Measure 

% buildings that have at least one tap water fixture with bottle filling capacity 

UBC Vancouver
Campus DataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver91%

B

UBC Okanagan 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Okanagan100%

B

 

Food & Nutrition Highlights 

Addressing Heightened Food Insecurity During COVID-19 

Food insecurity is a major issue on college campuses across Canada, and UBC is no exception—recent data shows that 37% of undergrad students at UBC Vancouver, and 42% at UBC Okanagan experience some degree of food insecurity. 

In order to address this issue at the height of the pandemic, grassroots efforts of volunteers, the Faculty of Education, Origin Church, Acadia Park community, AMS Food Bank, Student Housing and Community Services, and UBC Wellbeing assisted the community in supporting over 500 students and families with weekly food and baby supplies hampers.     

Learn more about UBC's Food Security Initiative
 

 

Increasing Student Access to Affordable Food: UBC Meal Share Pilot Program

The Food Security Initiative (FSI) launched a UBC Meal Share pilot with the support of donors to the Student Wellbeing Fund to ensure students have access to food.

At UBC Vancouver, 96 students were provided funds to purchase food via their UBC card, ensuring a low barrier and discrete access to minimize food insecurity. Next year, the program will be launched at both main campuses to support more students. 

Learn more about UBC Meal Share
 

 

Creating a Vision for a Community Food Hub at UBCO 

Campus Health partnered with a Sustainability Scholar to conduct a campus community consultation, creating a vision for the Community Food Hub at the Okanagan Campus.

Over 100 key stakeholders and students held 23 consultation sessions students, developing a vision with VOICE 5 food security research approaches.

The consultation prioritized inclusion, equity, accessibility, reconciliation, and sustainability, identifying the need for both an indoor and outdoor space to support skill-building, advocacy, and community-building around food. Next steps to improve the program have been identified to increase collaborations across campus to support the Food Hub. 
 

 

Empowering Students, Faculty & Staff with Nutrition Resources: NourishU 

The Nutrition Month Program, funded by UBC Wellbeing, successfully began this year with 545 participants. The NourishU journey provided daily education and reflection opportunities focus on intuitive eating and body image.

More than 80% of survey respondents agreed or strongly agreed that NourishU improved their relationship with food, respect for their body, acceptance of all body shapes and sizes, motivation to participate in joyful movement, and ability to challenge the social pressure to conform to the “thin ideal.” 

Learn more about NourishU
 

 

Promoting Food Security in Higher Education 

To increase opportunities for the campus community to explore local food environments and build community-wide food security, in March 2021 over 700 students, staff, faculty, and community members attended 12 virtual events as part of the “Promoting Food Security in Higher Education” conference series organized in partnership with Meal Exchange, University of Guelph, McMaster University, University of Ottawa.

The conference sessions emphasized the intersectional and interconnectedness of affordability, sustainability, equity and social justice and Indigenous food sovereignty. Research was also conducted as part of the conference, with one project focusing on the co-development of principles for promoting food security in higher education that all institutions can strive towards.

As a follow-up to the conference, a series of meetings were held over the summer to establish food security in higher education networks to advance food security and its intersectional areas across Canada in collaboration with other institutions. 

Watch recorded conference sessions
 

Promoting Healthy Beverages on Campus 

This year, various collaborators from across UBC made progress on the Healthy Beverage Initiative (HBI), with numerous initiatives completed on both campuses.

A UBC Okanagan dining location (Sunshine) was transitioned to be 100% HBI compliant. The commitment to transition all of our vending machines at UBC Vancouver to align with the HBI, has been fulfilled as well.  

In addition, the working group published a paper on the Healthy Beverage Initiative in the Journal of Public Health Nutrition and presented findings at the Centre for Science in the Public Interest’s Sugary Beverages Summit.
 

Read "Changing the beverage landscape on a large post-secondary campus"

Learn more about the Healthy Beverage Initiative
 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Paul H. Joseph / UBC Brand & Marketing

 

Built & Natural Environments

Active Transportation 

At least 66% of all trips to and from UBC made by walking, cycling or transit by 2040

  UBCO target in development.

Metrics 
Measure  

% of trips made by walking, cycling or transit

 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver31%-25% (decline)

 

 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Okanagan43%B

 

 

Complete Communities 

Increase opportunities for people to learn, work, play, and live on our campuses through an increase in the number of student beds to 17,300 and an increase in child care spaces to 1,200 by 2040

​​​​
Metrics 
Measure

# of student beds 

 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver12,4250

 

 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Okanagan1,900+220 (improvement)

 

 
Measure 

# of child care spaces 

 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver1,000+49 (improvement)
 
CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Okanagan *Childcare facilities are not run by UBC on this campusN/AN/A

 

Built & Natural Environment Highlights 

Building a Vision for Sustainable Transportation at UBCO   

Campus + Community Planning started the engagement process for the UBC Okanagan Transportation Plan with a virtual public open house and stakeholder workshops. This 18-month planning process will create a long-term vision for transportation at UBC Okanagan, including the establishment of transportation-related targets and objectives, and strategies to achieve them. This plan for sustainable and active transportation is being developed to support future campus growth, community wellbeing, and climate action. 

Learn about the UBC Okanagan Transportation Plan
 

Enhancing Supports for Families on Campus: Wesbrook YMCA Child Care Centre Opens

The new Wesbrook YMCA Child Care Centre opened in 2020, operated as a partnership between the YMCA, UNA, and UBC. Designed by Francl Architects and Attentus Landscape Architecture, the Centre offers 49 child care spaces with the internal space divided into three separate areas to accommodate different age groups - infants, under 18 months, toddlers, and 3 to 5 years.  

The Wesbrook YMCA Child Care Centre is the greenest child care centre to open at UBC. It is one of the first buildings on campus to address the UBC Green Building Action Plan strategies in energy, water, materials and resources, biodiversity, health and wellbeing, quality, climate adaption, and place and experience. The Centre is built to encourage children to move, explore and enjoy the space, inside and out. Skylights are incorporated throughout the building to provide natural light and the outdoor play areas are integrated within the natural landscape.  

In addition, renovations to Berwick Child Development Centre were completed to expand the life of the building, preserving the existing 96 spaces for another 15-20 years. 
 

 

Enhancing MacInnes Field 

 

MacInnes Field Public Realm upgrades were completed in 2020, providing 57,000 square feet of turf field for recreation and athletics, located behind the AMS Nest for the community to enjoy.

Along the eastern perimeter of the field, ten carvings featuring traditional First Nations designs of eagles, thunderbirds, and salmon, designed by Musqueum artist Brent Sparrow, have been cast in bronze and installed. These carvings help establish community ties and further acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. 
​​​​

 

Expanding UBC Vancouver Child Care Services

UBC is committed to expanding childcare to ensure child care services are available on campus for families who live, study and work on campus. The Child Care Expansion Plan (CCEP) provides a framework to deliver on UBC’s childcare policy commitments, addressing long-range institutional needs and neighbourhood childcare demands on the Vancouver Point Grey Campus.

As of January 2021, the available inventory increased to 763 childcare spaces and 237 out-of-school care spaces. The CCEP aims to create an inventory of approximately 1,200 spaces by 2041, with a focus on delivering more childcare spaces for children under 3 years of age. 
 

 

Continuing Advocacy for Rapid Transit to UBC  

UBC continues to work with its partners, Musqueum, Squamish, and Tsleil-Watuth First Nations, and the City of Vancouver to jointly advocate for rapid transit to UBC. The aim is to ensure the SkyTrain project is built as a seamless continuation of the Broadway Subway Project, which is now under construction and will terminate at Arbutus Street. If we are successful, we could see a station at UBC by 2030.  

Learn more about UBC SkyTrain Advocacy
 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Paul H. Joseph / UBC Brand & Marketing

Social Connection 

 

Feel Part of a Community 

10% increase in UBC community members feeling part of a community by 2025.

Metrics 
Measure

I have a group, community, or social circle at school (my workplace) where I feel I belong (feel at home, known connected to, support in my identity)*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 42%-15% (decline)
Graduate Students 44%-15% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined54%B
Staff55%B
Faculty51%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students 46%-8% (decline)
Graduate Students 47%-15% (decline)
Staff and Faculty combined53%B
Staff57%B
Faculty39%B
Measure

% First-year students that visit Collegia (Vancouver only) at least once a week

CampusDataChange from baseline (B)
Vancouver33%B (No 2021 data due to COVID)
Measure 

I feel that I am part of a community at UBC*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined70%B
Staff63%B
Faculty72%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined67%B
Staff52%B
Faculty75%B

*% who strongly agree or agree

 

Inclusive Environment 

10% increase in UBC community members reporting that their beliefs, identity and experiences are valued by 2025.

Metrics 
Measure 

At my institution, I am respected regardless of my personal characteristics, identity or background (e.g., gender, ethnicity, international status, disability, etc.).​​​​​​*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students71%B
Graduate Students68%B
Staff and Faculty combined67%B
Staff69%B
Faculty57%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Undergraduate Students79%B
Graduate Students68%B
Staff and Faculty combined67%B
Staff69%B
Faculty56%B
Measure

My diversity is valued in the workplace*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined74%B
Staff76%B
Faculty67%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined68%B
Staff75%B
Faculty53%B
Measure

People treat each other with respect and consideration in my workplace*

UBC Vancouver 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined77%B
Staff78%B
Faculty73%B
UBC Okanagan 
Population DataChange from baseline (B)
Staff and Faculty combined69%B
Staff75%B
Faculty58%B

 

*% who strongly agree or agree

 

Social Connection Highlights

Launching the Indigenous Strategic Plan & Implementation Toolkit ​​​​​

The UBC 2020 Indigenous Strategic Plan (ISP) was formally launched on September 14, 2020, with the support of the UBC community, to provide a framework for reconciliation in a post-secondary context. To help the implementation of indigenous rights as a UBC community across both campuses, the Office of Indigenous Strategic Initiatives has developed an ISP Implementation Toolkit units can use to help situate themselves in relation to Indigenous engagement and align their work with the ISP. 

 A specific focus is being placed on the ISP Self-Assessment Tool, which encourages units to take the time to slow down and reflect on where they are currently situated in relation to the ISP and the work of decolonization.  

Additionally, important tools part of the toolkit, include the Intent to Action Tool to establish how the goals of the ISP can coincide with the relevant unit and department goals.  

The toolkit is continuously being modified and improved, so be sure to check it regularly to stay up to date. 
 

 

Building a Community of Care

While the pandemic brought many challenges that limited the ability to gather in person, we were inspired by the compassion, connection, and creativity demonstrated by the UBC community over the past year and the ways in which they have supported one another by sharing their skills and talents through community programming and initiatives.  

A special “Community of Care” grant program, launched by the Campus + Community Planning Programming team provided funds to projects that shared skills online, provided care packages to vulnerable community members and other ways to foster social connections while socially distanced. Community members rose to the challenge with great projects including sewing and distributing free homemade face masks, building a rainbow picnic table for community members to enjoy, a social-justice-focused book club, a postal art project that connected youth in campus neighbourhoods together as pen pals, and more.  
 

 

Implementing Equity & Inclusion Tools 

In 2020, the Health Promotion & Education unit (HPE) embarked on a review of their programming and services using the Equity & Inclusion Office’s Inclusion Self-Assessment Tool (ISAT). Professional staff, student staff, and student volunteers contributed their ideas and feedback across four sessions that took place in fall 2020 and winter 2021. As a result of this process, unit-level strengths, areas of improvement and recommended actions were identified in respect to HPE’s work in advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI).  

Health Equity has been identified as a key priority for HPE as the unit undergoes its planning for the 2021-22 academic cycle. This priority aligns with the University’s strategic priorities and strategies including anti-racism, the Indigenous Student Plan, the Inclusion Action Plan, and the Wellbeing Strategic Framework. 

As one of HPE’s many initiatives underway that centers on EDI and the student experience, the ISAT was identified as a tool that could facilitate conversations within the unit to better understand our work in advancing EDI and where there are opportunities for growth and development. Some key recommendations include reviewing recruitment and hiring of student staff and volunteers, consistent training in EDI, and program offerings that support equity deserving groups. 
 

 

Strengthening Connections through Indigenous Ways of Knowing

An Indigenous pine needle basket weaving workshop provided the Indigenous Studies in Kinesiology program the opportunity to gather virtually for a traditional workshop, enhancing team and workplace connections. Faculty, staff, and students connected with traditional Indigenous ways of knowing, worked towards new problem-solving skills and strengthened connections to holistic health and wellness. 

The initiative also supported the teachings of traditional activities from a local community in which their program is situated. As adaptations were essential due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the initiative was held virtually and helped their team discover vital strategies to combat stress, as well as acknowledge and appreciate sacred traditional practices and cultural teachings. 
 

Student Engagement: Conversation Cafes 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Health Promotion and Education (HPE) shifted programs, support and service offerings online. Now more than ever, health equity is a priority that guides their work. Through an equity, diversity and inclusion lens the HPE team endeavoured to hear more diverse experiences and perspectives of mental health to help shape ongoing student health and wellbeing support.  

In planning for the upcoming 2021-22 academic year, we invited diverse student groups on campus to connect with professional staff in groups and one on one. Groups engaged included students who identify as IBPOC/BIPOC, first-generation, LGBTQ2S, and international students. From conversations, HPE heard the need for greater representation amongst professional staff, more diverse offerings of mental health support that are distinct from traditional biomedical supports, safe spaces for students of equity deserving groups to connect and show up and be accepted as their authentic selves, and a need to be included in the conversation about student mental health. 
 

 Sharing “What Lights You Up?”  

During an especially challenging year, UBC community members shared what brings them joy with artwork or animation that answered the prompt, “What Lights You Up?” Each design was accompanied by personal stories that ranged from reflections of coping in the pandemic to favourite childhood memories and first experiences at UBC, while some used their designs to provide uplifting messages to the community.  The selected winners had their designs projected through a lighting system onto Raymond and Money Lee Square, creating some lovely evening animation. 
 

Letting Kids Rule the Campus 

Hundreds of families call UBC home, including many children who have seen disruptions to school and extracurricular activities due to the pandemic. Led by the Community Programming unit in Campus + Community Planning and the Arts and Culture District, 14 UBC departments—including the School of Music, Beaty Biodiversity Museum, and the Department of Astronomy & Physics — partnered on the annual Kids Takeover UBC celebration.  The initiative moved the fun and learning to an interactive, online treehouse that provided free musical performances, family-friendly theatre, hands-on workshops and more. This two-day event welcomed families living both on and off-campus, to join in the fun.   
 

 


 

 

 

UBC Wellbeing Annual Report 2020-21- Infographic 

Full UBC Wellbeing Annual Report 2020-21- Infographic 

Wellbeing Annual Report Data Collection 

In developing the Wellbeing Strategic Framework, a number of stakeholders were consulted to determine targets and indicators. In this second year of reporting, we continue to develop baselines and the measures throughout are presented from data that is currently available. These measures are intended to give a snapshot of our campuses and only some track changes towards each target. We look forward to continuing our collaborative work around data collection and to working across units and departments to advance the targets. 

The UBC Wellbeing Annual Report relies on data from a variety of sources, such as the Undergraduate Experience Survey, (for current undergraduate student data presented), the Workplace Experience Survey, and the Canadian Campus Wellbeing Survey (CCWS). Additionally, data is used from various partners, such as Student Housing and Community Services, Campus and Community Planning, and UBC HR

This year, the CCWS was piloted for employees at UBC. The response rate was 12.8%. The conclusions contained within the report are descriptive of the responses received, not the full employee population and may not reflect actual employee behaviours. However, we encourage UBC stakeholders to consider the survey responses of these employees despite the low response rates.

The CCWS for students was deployed in March 2021. The response rate was 13.6%. The conclusions contained within the report are descriptive of the responses received, not the full student population and may not reflect actual student behaviours. UBC stakeholders are encouraged to consider the survey responses as guiding in partnership with other relevant student data. 

To focus action, the Wellbeing Strategic Framework identified targets and indicators that support our understanding of impact and change. In an institution like UBC, complexity of population-based data cannot be underestimated. Aligning measures across populations and coordinating survey instruments remains a challenge demonstrated by data gaps as well as the current lack of baseline data and targets for some priority areas.

UBC Wellbeing is working with partners to address these challenges and align measures.

 

Working Together

These are just a few of the many examples of policies, programs, plans and initiatives that UBC departments, units, and community members have undertaken over the past year to activate the Wellbeing Strategic Framework and help UBC towards our vision of becoming a health and wellbeing promoting institution.

So how will you embed wellbeing into your workplace, learning environment, or organization? And how can we help?

We all have a hand in shaping campus environments that support health, wellbeing, and sustainability. By championing wellbeing, together we can build stronger, healthier, and more inclusive communities at UBC and beyond.

We all have a hand in shaping campus environments that support health, wellbeing, and sustainability. By championing wellbeing, we can build stronger and more inclusive communities at UBC and beyond.